JAMES L. ROBAR, PHD, FCCPM

Chief, Department of Medical Physics

Nova Scotia Health Authority
Professor James Robar is the Chief of Medical Physics in Nova Scotia and Director of MSc and PhD Medical Physics programs at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. His primary appointment is with the Department of Radiation Oncology and he is cross-appointed to the Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science. Dr. Robar’s research interests include volume-of-interest image guidance, real-time position sensing, trajectory-based treatment delivery and novel MV beam lines for imaging and nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy.

Professor Robar brings over 15 years experience with stereotactic techniques and currently serves on the stereotactic body radiation therapy team in Halifax, Canada, which is a dynamic program treating lung, liver and spine indications.

He has a strong interest in education in medical physics and currently serves as the Vice President of the Board of Directors and graduate program reviewer of the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP).

“Novalis Certification exists to ensure that advanced technologies for SRS and SBRT are being implemented in accordance with best practices on a consistent basis.”

Actual Position:

Chief, Department of Medical Physics
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology
Dalhousie University, Canada

Education:

1994 BSc, Physics and Physiology McGill University, Canada
1997 MSc, Medical Physics McGill University, Canada
2000 PhD, Medical Physics University of British Columbia, Canada
2002 Residency, Rad Onc Medical Physics BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre

Communication language: English

Vitals

Institution: Dalhousie University

Speciality: Medical Physics

Region: North America

Country: Canada

Street: 5820 University Ave.

City: Halifax

Zip: 10549

Office: +1902 473 6020

Email: james.robar@nshealth.ca

Expert Forum

Start a discussion

View all topics

Interested in more?

Login here

Not a member?

Register now